Jesus, while he dwelt below…

Long, but like all of Hart’s hymns, worth reading and meditating on.

From Gadsby’s Hymns #802

1 Jesus, while he dwelt below,
As divine historians say,
To a place would often go;
Near to Kedron’s brook it lay;
In this place he loved to be,
And ’twas named Gethsemane.

2 ’Twas a garden, as we read,
At the foot of Olivet,
Low, and proper to be made
The Redeemer’s lone retreat;
When from noise he would be free,
Then he sought Gethsemane.

3 Thither, by their Master brought,
His disciples likewise came;
There the heavenly truths he taught
Often set their hearts on flame;
Therefore they, as well as he,
Visited Gethsemane.

4 Here they oft conversing sat,
Or might join with Christ in prayer;
O what blest devotion’s that,
When the Lord himself is there!
All things to them seemed to agree
To endear Gethsemane.

5 Here no strangers durst intrude;
But the Prince of Peace could sit,
Cheered with sacred solitude,
Wrapped in contemplation sweet;
Yet how little they could see
Why he chose Gethsemane!

6 Full of love to man’s lost race,
On his conflict much he thought;
This he knew the destined place,
And he loved the sacred spot;
Therefore ’twas he liked to be
Often in Gethsemane.

7 They his followers, with the rest,
Had incurred the wrath divine;
And their Lord, with pity pressed,
Longed to bear their loads – and mine;
Love to them, and love to me,
Made him love Gethsemane.

8 Many woes had he endured,
Many sore temptations met,
Patient, and to pains inured;
But the sorest trial yet,
Was to be sustained in thee,
Gloomy, sad Gethsemane.

9 Came at length the dreadful night,
Vengeance, with its iron rod,
Stood, and with collected might
Bruised the harmless Lamb of God;
See, my soul, thy Saviour see,
Grovelling in Gethsemane.

10 View him in that olive press,
Squeezed and wrung till ’whelmed in blood,
View thy Maker’s deep distress!
Hear the sighs and groans of God!
Then reflect what sin must be,
Gazing on Gethsemane.

11 Poor disciples, tell me now,
Where’s the love ye lately had,
Where’s the faith ye all could vow?
But this hour is too, too sad!
’Tis not now for such as ye
To support Gethsemane.

12 O what wonders love has done!
But how little understood!
God well knows, and God alone,
What produced that sweat of blood;
Who can thy deep wonders see,
Wonderful Gethsemane?

13 There my God bore all my guilt;
This through grace can be believed;
But the horrors which he felt,
Are too vast to be conceived.
None can penetrate through thee,
Doleful, dark Gethsemane.

14 Gloomy garden, on thy beds,
Washed by Kedron’s waters foul,
Grow most rank and bitter weeds;
Think on these, my sinful soul;
Would’st thou sin’s dominion flee,
Call to mind Gethsemane.

15 Sinners vile like me, and lost,
If there’s one so vile as I,
Leave more righteous souls to boast:
Leave them, and to refuge fly;
We may well bless that decree
Which ordained Gethsemane.

16 We can hope no healing hand,
Leprous quite throughout with sin;
Loathed incurables we stand,
Crying out, “Unclean, unclean!”
Help there’s none for such as we,
But in dear Gethsemane.

17 Eden, from each flowery bed,
Did for man short sweetness breathe;
Soon, by Satan’s counsel led,
Man wrought sin, and sin wrought death;
But of life, the healing tree
Grows in rich Gethsemane.

18 Hither, Lord, thou didst resort,
Ofttimes with thy little train;
Here would’st keep thy private court;
O confer that grace again;
Lord, resort with worthless me
Ofttimes to Gethsemane.

19 True, I can’t deserve to share
In a favour so divine;
But, since sin first fixed thee there,
None have greater sins than mine;
And to this my woeful plea,
Witness thou, Gethsemane.

20 Sins against a holy God;
Sins against his righteous laws;
Sins against his love, his blood;
Sins against his name, and cause;
Sins immense as is the sea –
Hide me, O Gethsemane!

21 Here’s my claim, and here alone;
None a Saviour more can need;
Deeds of righteousness I’ve none;
No, not one good work to plead;
Not a glimpse of hope for me,
Only in Gethsemane.]

22 Saviour, all the stone remove
From my flinty, frozen heart;
Thaw it with the beams of love,
Pierce it with the blood-dipped dart;
Wound the heart that wounded thee;
Melt it in Gethsemane.

23 Father, Son, and Holy Ghost,
One almighty God of love,
Hymned by all the heavenly host
In thy shining courts above;
We poor sinners, gracious THREE,
Bless thee for Gethsemane.

Born Again?

A spiritual fragment from the writings of William Gadsby:NPG D34258; William Gadsby by William Barnard, published by  L.I. Higham, after  F. Turner

When God, in his rich grace, takes a poor sinner manifestatively in hand, the first thing he does is to give life and light; when this divine life and light are communicated, the dead soul is quickened, and the dark soul is enlightened. We begin to see sin in the light of God’s countenance, and even our secret sins are laid open to the conscience, and we both see and feel that it is an evil and bitter thing to sin against God. The pure life and light of God, placed in the conscience against our vile deadness and darkness, horrifies the soul; and though we may not be able to account for our feelings and sight, we do find that we have such as we never had before, and such as we cannot get rid of. We now become, in soul and feeling, real sinners before a heart-searching God, and really tremble at his word; and in our souls we both see and feel that all our sins have been against a holy, just, and good God. We both feel and see that God is pure and we are impure, that God is just and we are unjust, and that there is an awful disparity between God and us, and we cry,

“What poor, vile sinner like me can stand before such a holy God, whose law I have broken in so many ways, and whose majesty I have so often insulted?”

Why Gadsby’s Hymns

It should be clear by now that I love Gadsby’s collection of hymns. William Gadsby offers some explanation for publishing his own collection of hymns in the preface to the last edition and these are precisely the same reasons why I love this little book so much. gadsby

First, he wanted to guard his flock against hymns that taught legalism. Secondly, the collection was complied as a way to standard Joseph Hart’s hymns. Thirdly, Gadsby wanted to remove any hymns that contained or hinted at Arminianism.

“Suffice it to say, that the church and people over which the Holy Ghost has made me overseer, and has been in the constant habit, ever since I came among them, of using Dr. Watts’s Psalms and Hymns, Rippon’s Selection, and Hart’s Composition. But though some of these hymns are big with the important truths of God, there are others, especially among Dr. Watts’s and Rippon’s, which give as legal a sound as if they had been forged at a certain foundry. This was one reason which induced me to publish a selection. Another was, we had three editions of Hart’s Hymns amongst us, either differently arranged or differently paged; so that when any of those hymns were given out, one part of the congregation was unable to find them. These circumstances, together with a desire in my own breast and the express wish of others to have a selection of hymns in one book free from Arminianism, and sound in the faith that the church might be edified and God glorified, were what induced me to attempt this work.” Manchester, November, 1838

Gadsby’s Hymns – On facebook

“To be employed with solemn pleasure in singing the praises of God with the spirit and with the understanding also, is a blessing peculiar to God’s elect; nor can even they be thus engaged, only as the blessed Spirit influences the mind, and favours them with the unction of his grace. It is one thing to have the ear charmed, and another to have the heart engaged in this most delightful part of God’s worship in his church below.” – William Gadsby

Check it out : https://www.facebook.com/GadsbysHymns

How Strange!

How strange is the course that a Christian must steer!
How perplexed is the path he must tread!
The hope of his happiness rises from fear,
And his life he receives from the dead.

His fairest pretensions must wholly be waived,
And his best resolutions be crossed;
Nor can he expect to be perfectly saved,
Till he finds himself utterly lost.

When all this is done, and his heart is assured
Of the total remission of sins,
When his pardon is signed and his peace is procured,
From that moment his conflict begins.

Gadsby’s Hymns#309

Comfort for Spiritual Mourners

Poor, sin-burdened, Satan-hunted, broken-hearted mourners!

All things are yours; for ye are Christ’s and Christ is God’s. Your life is hid with Christ in God, and because he lives ye shall live also. The blessed Redeemer is anointed to comfort his mourners, “to appoint unto them that mourn in Zion, to give unto them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, and the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness.” (Isa. 61:3) Yes, bless his precious and glorious name! In his own time he will, by the power of his Spirit, discover unto them the beauty of his own Person and righteousness; and then they shall see the King in his beauty, (Isa. 33:17) as the Lord their righteousness and strength. Jesus, in his Person, blood, and obedience; in his glorious offices, characters, relationship, names, honours, fullness, love, and loveliness, shall be revealed unto them, by the glorious power and under the divine anointing of God the Holy Ghost; and this shall produce a solemn joy in their souls, a joy unspeakable and full of glory.

Then shall their sorrow be turned into joy, and with holy pleasure and heavenly tranquility, they shall blessedly sing,

“I will greatly rejoice in the Lord;

my soul shall be joyful in my God;

for he hath clothed me with the garments of salvation,

he hath covered me with the robe of righteousness.” (Isa. 61:10)

– William Gadsby

Salvation by Christ alone. Rom. 11. 6; Gal. 3. 10

1 How can ye hope, deluded souls,
To see what none e’er saw,
Salvation by the works obtained
Of Sinai’s fiery law?

2 [There ye may toil, and weep, and fast,
And vex your heart with pain;
And, when you’ve ended, find at last
That all your toil was vain.]

3 That law but makes your guilt abound;
Sad help! and (what is worst)
All souls that under that are found,
By God himself are cursed.

4 [This curse pertains to those who break
One precept, e’er so small;
And where’s the man, in thought or deed,
That has not broken all?]

5 Fly, then, awakened sinners, fly;
Your case admits no stay;
The fountain’s opened now for sin;
Come, wash your guilt away.

6 See how from Jesus’ wounded side
The water flows and blood!
If you but touch that purple tide,
You then have peace with God.

7 Only by faith in Jesus’ wounds
The sinner finds release;
No other sacrifice for sin
Will God accept but this.

– Gadsby’s Hymns #45 / Jospeh Hart