Christian Soldier

“In the midst of battle, it is easy to get discouraged by the bumps, bruises, and wounds that we suffer. When we see other Christians fail, fall, or pass away, it can be devastating. So, we must be reminded that our Captain has already conquered sin and death. He is risen indeed! His strategies will never fail, and all of His soldiers will triumph. Let us look upward and forward to the time when He will dwell in the midst of His perfected church and will make all things new (Rev. 21:1–4).” Robert VanDoodewaard

Calvin’s Institutes

Christianbook.com has the single volume edition of Calvin’s Institutes on sale for $15.99. Years ago I purchased the two volume set by McNeill and Battles and read it through a few times. More recently a good friend sent me the sinlge volume, unabridged, 1845 Beveridge calvintranslation (with the older styled cover) and I do prefer it over the two volume set. A few quotes from Amazon will help explain why one might prefer Bereridge over other editions.

Reformed Christian scholar and theological philosopher Paul Helm:

“Incidentally, if you have the need of a translation of the Institutes, then the reissue of the Beveridge translation (newly published by Hendrickson) may be just the thing. It has new indexes, and has been ‘gently edited’, which means, I hope, only the removal of typos and other detritus. (I have not yet had the chance to check). Beveridge is superior to Battles in sticking closer to the original Latin, and having less intrusive editorial paraphernalia.”

Richard A. Muller, on the two translations (from the preface of The Unaccommodated Calvin):

“I have also consulted the older translations of the Institutes, namely those of Norton, Allen and Beveridge, in view of both the accuracy of those translation and the relationship in which they stand to the older or ‘precritical’ text tradition of Calvin’s original. Both in its apparatus and in its editorial approach to the text, the McNeill-Battles translation suffers from the mentality of the text-critic who hides the original ambience of the text even as he attempts to reveal all its secrets to the modern reader.”

from J.I. Packer in the foreword to A Theological Guide to Calvin’s Institutes:

“No English translation fully matches Calvin’s Latin; that of the Elizabethan, Thomas Norton, perhaps gets closest; Beveridge gives us Calvin’s feistiness but not always his precision; Battles gives us the precision but not always the punchiness, and fleetness of foot; Allen is smooth and clear, but low-key.”

David Calhoun:

“Let me just say a few words about English translations. The first was Thomas Norton back in the sixteenth century. Calvin was very fortunate with his first English translator. Norton did an exceptionally good job. Very soon after the completion of the Institutes in 1559, which was written in Latin, it was translated by Calvin into French and then quite soon into English. John Allen was the second translator. John Allen and Henry Beveridge were both nineteenth-century translators. The Beveridge translation is still in print. It was until fairly recently anyway. Those are not bad but not very good either. Ford Lewis Battles’ 1960 translation is the one that we are using. Even though it has been criticized some, it is by far the most superior translation that we have at present.”

Joshua Butcher’s Amazon review:

The recent reissue of Beveridge’s 19th century translation of Calvin’s Institutes is a very nice complement to the more comprehensive scholarly edition by McNeil (translated by Battles). If you are trying to decide between the Battles and the Beveridge translation here are a few things to consider.

1. The Battles has extensive editing, which includes a thorough cross-referencing of the pertinent quotations that Calvin refers to, as well as the pertinent Biblical texts and intertextual references. McNeil is a quality editor, but as with any editing, the view of the editor is never without a measure of bias. If you are looking to get a fresh interpretation of Calvin, you try reading the Beveridge first, or skip over the footnotes in the Battles.

2. The Beveridge provides alternative readings based upon the French edition of the Institutes. I’ve found this aspect to be quite interesting. Calvin’s style in French tends to be a bit more expansive and colorful than his Latin.

3. The Beveridge has the benefit of being a one-volume hardback, as opposed to the two-volume hardback of the Battles. The one-volume has a bit more heft to carry around, but you always have the complete work with you if you are out and about.

4. The subject headings are different in the two editions. The Beveridge provides a full sentence overview outline at the beginning of each chapter division, whereas the Battles provides subheadings for each minor section. There are pros and cons to each approach, of course.

Whatever edition you decide to get, you will not be disappointed. Calvin’s Institutes is a masterpiece of Western literature, and one of the most important works of the Christian Church of all time.

This edition has some nice features as well:

– An eight-page, four-color insert on coated stock, including a frontispiece featuring the title page of the original publication and a timeline of the Reformation and of John Calvin’s life

– Two ribbon markers

– Gold foil and embossing

– Linen end sheets

Even if you disagree with Calvin…you should read him. His influence on the church cannot be ignored.

Yours in the Lord,

jm

Prayer

A. W. Pink, “…what is now being taught on the subject of prayer, and the deplorable thing is that scarcely a voice is lifted in protest. To say that “human destinies may be changed and moulded by the will of man” is rank infidelity—that is the only proper term for it. Should any one challenge this classification, we would ask them whether they can find an infidel anywhere who would dissent from such a statement, and we are confident that such an one could not be found. To say that “God has ordained that human destinies may be changed and moulded by the will of man”, is absolutely untrue. “Human destiny” is settled not by “the will of man,” but by the will of God. That which determines human destiny is whether or not a man has been born again, for it is written, “Except a man be born again he cannot see the kingdom of God”. And as to whose will, whether God’s or man’s, is responsible for the new birth is settled, unequivocally, by John 1:13—”Which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but OF GOD”. To say that “human destiny” may be changed by the will of man, is to make the creature’s will supreme, and that is, virtually, to dethrone God. But what saith the Scriptures? Let the Book answer: “The Lord killeth, and maketh alive: He bringeth down to the grave, and bringeth up. The Lord maketh poor, and maketh rich: He bringeth low, and lifteth up. He raiseth up the poor out of the dust, and lifteth up the beggar from the dunghill, to set them among princes, and to make them inherit the throne of glory” (1 Sam. 2:6-8). Link

John Gill provides a proper theological background to prayer, “…it should be said that God’s will is immutable, and cannot be altered by our crying. When the mind of God is not toward a people to do them good, it cannot be turned to them by the most fervent and importunate prayers of those who have the greatest interest in Him—”Then said the Lord unto me, Though Moses and Samuel stood before Me, yet My mind could not be toward this people: cast them out of My sight, and let them go forth” (Jer. 15:1). The prayers of Moses to enter the promised land is a parallel case.

Our views respecting prayer need to be revised and brought into harmony with the teaching of Scripture on the subject. The prevailing idea seems to be, that I come to God and ask Him for something that I want, and that I expect Him to give me that which I have asked. But this is a most dishonoring and degrading conception. The popular belief reduces God to a servant, our servant: doing our bidding, performing our pleasure, granting our desires. No; prayer is a coming to God, telling Him my need, committing my way unto the Lord, and leaving Him to deal with it as seemeth Him best. This makes my will subject to His, instead of, as in the former case, seeking to bring His will into subjection to mine. No prayer is pleasing to God unless the spirit actuating it is, “not my will, but thine be done”.

“When God bestows blessings on a praying people, it is not for the sake of their prayers, as if He was inclined and turned by them; but it is for His own sake, and of His own sovereign will and pleasure. Should it be said, to what purpose then is prayer? it is answered, This is the way and means God has appointed, for the communication of the blessing of His goodness to His people. For though He has purposed, provided, and promised them, yet He will be sought unto, to give them, and it is a duty and privilege to ask. When they are blessed with a spirit of prayer, it forebodes well, and looks as if God intended to bestow the good things asked, which should be asked always with submission to the will of God, saying, Not my will but Thine be done

Sin

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It is not the absence of sin but the grieving over it which distinguishes the child of God from empty professors”  A.W. Pink

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yours in the Lord,

jm

Westminster Reference Bible

Without question I’m a AV guy, I love the King James and have used it for most of my Christian life. It’s the translation I read from on a daily basis, study from, where my devotional reading is found, etc. I have multiple editions of the Authorized Version and love every one of them, even my Old Scofield. The number one edition of the AV I use is the Westminster Reference Bible printed by the Trinitarian Bible Society. I own three editions of this Bible and use them at different times. I find it easier to memorize if I use the same Bible even if it’s in different sizes. I’m making this post so you can see the difference in size between the three editions.

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Descriptions were sourced from the TBS website. You will see the Compact, Medium Size Print and Large Print.

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Compact Bible with double column references and Metrical Psalms. Black calfskin leather. Authorised (King James) Version.

Compact Westminster Reference Bible in black calfskin leather with Metrical Psalms. This Bible contains over two hundred thousand cross references, and also features 8 full-colour maps. Ideal as a gift or for personal use. Supplied with presentation box. [Was PS60U/BK]

Features

Print size 7.3 points, Presentation box, Good clear print, Cross references, Black text throughout, Sewn binding, Four marker ribbons, Bible paper, Gilt page edges, Semi-yapp page protection, Decorative head and tail bands

Additional Contents

Gift presentation page; The Epistle Dedicatory; List of pronunciation of words and proper names; Word list in margins; Tables of weights and measures; Daily Bible reading plan; Colour maps; Metrical Psalms

Details

Page Size:166 x 118mm (6.5″ x 4.6″)

Thickness:33mm (1.3″)

Print Size:7.3 point

Product Code:60MP/UBK(was PS60U/BK)

ISBN:9781862284531

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Medium print Bible with double column references. Vinyl covered hardback. Authorised (King James) Version.

Westminster Reference Bible in black vinyl covered hardback. This Bible contains over two hundred thousand cross references, and also features a concordance and 8 full-colour maps. [Was 90A]

Features

Medium print ׃ 9.6 points, Good clear print, Cross references, Black text throughout, Sewn binding, Two marker ribbons, Bible paper, Decorative head and tail bands

Additional Contents

Gift presentation page; Translators to the Reader; The Epistle Dedicatory; List of pronunciation of words and proper names; Word list in margins; Tables of weights and measures; Daily Bible reading plan; Concordance; Colour maps

Details

Page Size:215 x 153mm (8.5″ x 6″)

Thickness:33mm (1.3″)

Print Size:9.6 point

Product Code:90/ABK(was 90A)

ISBN:9781862281493

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Large print Bible with double column references. Black calfskin leather. Authorised (King James) Version.

Large Print Westminster Reference Bible in calfskin leather. This Bible contains over two hundred thousand cross references, and also features 8 full-colour maps.

Features

Large print ׃ 11.8 points, Presentation box, Good clear print, Cross references, Black text throughout, Sewn binding, Four marker ribbons, Bible paper, Gilt page edges, Semi-yapp page protection, Decorative head and tail bands

Additional Contents

Gift presentation page; The Epistle Dedicatory; List of pronunciation of words and proper names; Word list in margins; Tables of weights and measures; Daily Bible reading plan; Colour maps

Details

Page Size:265 x 188mm (10.4″ x 7.4″)

Thickness:34mm (1.3″)

Print Size:11.8 point

Product Code:120LP/UBK

ISBN:9781862284753

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I now have five TBS Bibles in total and each one of my children own and have used the leather Winsdor Text editions. What can I say, these are great Bibles for cheap. The binding is solid, the leather is nice and flexible, even the vinyl is of good quality. I know the Large Print Westmister seems HUGE and it is. When I first opened the box I thought it was way too big to take back and forth to church with me but it is a real pleasure to read from. I type this post up in my very low lite basement study area and have no trouble making out the Bible in front of me. It’s just under a 12 point font but the way the text is spaced, coupled with the thickness of the paper allows me to read from it without issue. This is a text I can read and teach from without any issue and I highly recommend it.

Yours in the Lord,

jm

Request for prayer

TBS posted the following prayer request October 19th. Please offer prayer for the Trinitarian Bible Society who remains a consistent witness to the word of God. For many of us Reformed folks who hold to the old Reformed confessions, the Protestant Bible, especially the Authorized Version holds a special place in our churches.

As the Westminster and Second London Baptist Confessions so clearly state,

“immediately inspired by God, and by his singular care and providence kept pure in all ages, are therefore authentic; so as in all controversies of religion, the church is finally to appeal to them.” (article 1:8)

TBS

At the time of writing the Lord has not yet seen fit in His infinite wisdom to send a tenant for the Society’s investment property, John Wycliffe House, after nearly a year of advertising. This matter is becoming an increasing concern because the Society is around £210,000 per annum worse off without a tenant, meaning the Society’s General Fund budget will be significantly impacted in 2019.  We seek your prayers that a suitable tenant may be provided, but if it is not His will to do so that the General Committee and Senior Management would be given much wisdom to know what to do.

In addition, the Society in the UK is facing another significant financial challenge: whereas historically legacy income has averaged around £400,000 per annum, there has been an almost complete absence of legacy income in 2018. Normally this income would have been carried forward and used to support the 2019 budget. This, combined with the matter of John Wycliffe House, has left us with severe challenges in reaching a sustainable budget for 2019. We seek your urgent prayers that the Lord would appear for us financially once again, and also that He would grant much wisdom to the Society’s Trustees and Senior Management.

Effort in the Flesh

burden“In the great majority of cases, professing Christians are too puffed up by a sense of what they suppose they are doing for God, to earnestly study what God has promised to do for and in His people. They are so occupied with their fleshly efforts to “win souls for Christ” that they feel not their own deep need of the Spirit’s anointing. The leaders of “Christian” (?) enterprise are so concerned in multiplying “Christian workers” that quantity, not quality, is the main consideration. How few today recognize that if the number of “missionaries” on the foreign field were increased twenty-fold the next year, that that, of itself, would not ensure the genuine salvation of one additional heathen? Even though every new missionary were “sound in the faith” and preached only “the Truth,” that would not add one iota of spiritual power to the missionary forces, without the Holy Spirit’s unction and blessing! The same principle holds good everywhere. If the orthodox seminaries and the much-advertised Bible institutes turned out 100 times more men than they are now doing, the churches would not be one bit better off than they are, unless God given a fresh outpouring of His Spirit. In like manner, no Sunday School is strengthened by the mere multiplication of its teachers.

O my readers,

face the solemn fact that the greatest lack of all in Christendom today is the absence of the Holy Spirit’s power and blessing. Review the activities of the past 30 years. Millions of dollars have been freely devoted to the support of professed Christian enterprises.

Bible institutes and schools have turned out “trained workers” by the thousands.

Bible conferences have sprung up on every side like mushrooms.

Countless booklets and tracts have been printed and circulated.

Time and labors have been given by an almost incalculable number of “personal workers.” And with what results? 

Has the standard of personal piety advanced? Are the churches less worldly? Are their members more Christ-like in their daily walk? Is there more godliness in the home? Are the children more obedient and respectful? Is the Sabbath Day being increasingly sanctified and kept holy? Has the standard of honesty in business been raised?

The Need:

Those blessed with any spiritual discernment can return but one answer to the above questions. In spite of all the huge sums of money that have been spent, in spite of all the labors which has been put forth, in spite of all the new workers that have been added to the old ones, the spirituality of Christendom is at a far lower ebb today than it was 30 years ago. Numbers of professing Christians have increased, fleshly activities have multiplied, but spiritual power has waned. Why? Because there is a grieved and quenched Spirit in our midst. While His blessing is withheld there can be no improvement. What is needed today is for the saints to get down on their faces before God, cry unto Him in the name of Christ to so work again, that what has grieved His Spirit may be put away, and the channel of blessing once more be opened.

Until the Holy Spirit is again given His rightful place in our hearts, thoughts, and activities, there can be no improvement. Until it be recognized that we are entirely dependent upon His operations for all spiritual blessing, the root of the trouble cannot be reached. Until it be recognized that it is “‘Not by might, (of trained workers), nor by power (of intellectual argument or persuasive appeal), but by MY SPIRIT, says the Lord” (Zechariah 4:6), there will be no deliverance from that fleshly zeal which is not according to knowledge, and which is now paralyzing Christendom. Until the Holy Spirit is honored, sought, and counted upon, the present spiritual drought must continue. May it please our gracious God to give the writer messages and prepare the hearts of our readers to receive that which will be to His glory, the furtherance of His cause upon earth, and the good of His dear people.

Brethren, pray for us.”

A. W. Pink