The Traditionalist!

Survey says!?! (take the worldview quiz here)

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Thank you for taking the worldview test!

The test is based on extensive academic research and has been shown to generate fairly consistent results. You can find more information about the research here.

Here are your results:

The worldview you identify with most is called traditional. Out of 17 questions, you have a total score of 12 on this worldview. (This score is calculated by counting the times you “most agreed” with this worldview, subtracted by the times you “least agreed” with this worldview.)

The worldview you identify with least is called modern. You have a total score of -7 on this worldview. (This score is calculated by counting the times you “least agreed” with this worldview, subtracted by the times you “most agreed” with this worldview.)

Learn about your dominant, traditional worldview, here.

There is great power in knowing your worldview! Not as a label to put on yourself, but in the sense of exploring the set of assumptions that guide you in your day-to-day life. As the ancient Greeks already taught centuries ago: “know thyself!”

If you enjoyed learning about your worldview, please share the test with your friends on Facebook and other platforms!

Thank you for being curious about your worldview!

With warm regards,
Annick de Witt

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Mobile Command Unit

Ok, I broke down and ordered one of those fancy Reformation Study Bibles.

I have the old “Reformation Study Bible,” you know, the edition just after they changed the name from the New Geneva Study Bible? It was a solid Bible and I used it often so when I noticed the crimson hardcover was on sale I picked one up…which is difficult to do considering the weight of the volume! It’s not that heavy, I was joking, it weights in at about 4 lbs.

This edition offers a very clean page style, the font is easy to read and the paper is bright white and thicker when compared to some of my other study bibles. (The ESV Study Bible which is WAY too thin if you ask me). The notes have been updated and revised as you probably already know. The confessions in the back are useful and the sidebar theological notes are extremely valuable, which is why I call it a Mobile Command Unit. I like to bring my Bible along with me to the coffee shop and read it during lunch. Sometimes the Bible I’m reading will solicit a comment or two. The sidebar notes are useful in these situations because it allows you to on the same page when discussing a theological subject when blind sided with random conversation.

It has everything you need to do battle!

reformation study bible crimson

8/10

I gave The Reformation Study Bible an 8 out of 10. It lost a point due to the single column paragraph setup. When reading, studying or even arguing over something from scripture, I’ve found it helps to have a versified two column Bible. Maybe that’s just me. This Bible lost another point due to the limit in translations (ESV/NKJV). It would be nice to have this study Bible with a modern Geneva translation or the King James. I’m thankful for The Reformation Heritage Study Bible which does come in my preferred translations and I would recommend that edition in a hearbeat.

That’s all for now folks.

Yours in the Lord,

jm

Christian Soldier

“In the midst of battle, it is easy to get discouraged by the bumps, bruises, and wounds that we suffer. When we see other Christians fail, fall, or pass away, it can be devastating. So, we must be reminded that our Captain has already conquered sin and death. He is risen indeed! His strategies will never fail, and all of His soldiers will triumph. Let us look upward and forward to the time when He will dwell in the midst of His perfected church and will make all things new (Rev. 21:1–4).” Robert VanDoodewaard

Calvin’s Institutes

Christianbook.com has the single volume edition of Calvin’s Institutes on sale for $15.99. Years ago I purchased the two volume set by McNeill and Battles and read it through a few times. More recently a good friend sent me the sinlge volume, unabridged, 1845 Beveridge calvintranslation (with the older styled cover) and I do prefer it over the two volume set. A few quotes from Amazon will help explain why one might prefer Bereridge over other editions.

Reformed Christian scholar and theological philosopher Paul Helm:

“Incidentally, if you have the need of a translation of the Institutes, then the reissue of the Beveridge translation (newly published by Hendrickson) may be just the thing. It has new indexes, and has been ‘gently edited’, which means, I hope, only the removal of typos and other detritus. (I have not yet had the chance to check). Beveridge is superior to Battles in sticking closer to the original Latin, and having less intrusive editorial paraphernalia.”

Richard A. Muller, on the two translations (from the preface of The Unaccommodated Calvin):

“I have also consulted the older translations of the Institutes, namely those of Norton, Allen and Beveridge, in view of both the accuracy of those translation and the relationship in which they stand to the older or ‘precritical’ text tradition of Calvin’s original. Both in its apparatus and in its editorial approach to the text, the McNeill-Battles translation suffers from the mentality of the text-critic who hides the original ambience of the text even as he attempts to reveal all its secrets to the modern reader.”

from J.I. Packer in the foreword to A Theological Guide to Calvin’s Institutes:

“No English translation fully matches Calvin’s Latin; that of the Elizabethan, Thomas Norton, perhaps gets closest; Beveridge gives us Calvin’s feistiness but not always his precision; Battles gives us the precision but not always the punchiness, and fleetness of foot; Allen is smooth and clear, but low-key.”

David Calhoun:

“Let me just say a few words about English translations. The first was Thomas Norton back in the sixteenth century. Calvin was very fortunate with his first English translator. Norton did an exceptionally good job. Very soon after the completion of the Institutes in 1559, which was written in Latin, it was translated by Calvin into French and then quite soon into English. John Allen was the second translator. John Allen and Henry Beveridge were both nineteenth-century translators. The Beveridge translation is still in print. It was until fairly recently anyway. Those are not bad but not very good either. Ford Lewis Battles’ 1960 translation is the one that we are using. Even though it has been criticized some, it is by far the most superior translation that we have at present.”

Joshua Butcher’s Amazon review:

The recent reissue of Beveridge’s 19th century translation of Calvin’s Institutes is a very nice complement to the more comprehensive scholarly edition by McNeil (translated by Battles). If you are trying to decide between the Battles and the Beveridge translation here are a few things to consider.

1. The Battles has extensive editing, which includes a thorough cross-referencing of the pertinent quotations that Calvin refers to, as well as the pertinent Biblical texts and intertextual references. McNeil is a quality editor, but as with any editing, the view of the editor is never without a measure of bias. If you are looking to get a fresh interpretation of Calvin, you try reading the Beveridge first, or skip over the footnotes in the Battles.

2. The Beveridge provides alternative readings based upon the French edition of the Institutes. I’ve found this aspect to be quite interesting. Calvin’s style in French tends to be a bit more expansive and colorful than his Latin.

3. The Beveridge has the benefit of being a one-volume hardback, as opposed to the two-volume hardback of the Battles. The one-volume has a bit more heft to carry around, but you always have the complete work with you if you are out and about.

4. The subject headings are different in the two editions. The Beveridge provides a full sentence overview outline at the beginning of each chapter division, whereas the Battles provides subheadings for each minor section. There are pros and cons to each approach, of course.

Whatever edition you decide to get, you will not be disappointed. Calvin’s Institutes is a masterpiece of Western literature, and one of the most important works of the Christian Church of all time.

This edition has some nice features as well:

– An eight-page, four-color insert on coated stock, including a frontispiece featuring the title page of the original publication and a timeline of the Reformation and of John Calvin’s life

– Two ribbon markers

– Gold foil and embossing

– Linen end sheets

Even if you disagree with Calvin…you should read him. His influence on the church cannot be ignored.

Yours in the Lord,

jm

Our Daysman

Happy Lord’s Day!

 

Webster’s 1828: DA’YSMAN, n. An umpire or arbiter; a mediator.
Neither is there any daysman betwixt us. Job 9.

There is one mediator between the Lord and man,
Christ Jesus was our daysman our sins were laid on Him.

Wounded for our transgressions and justice for our peace,
yet God was pleased to bruise Him for our iniquities.

With one hand on the heaven and one hand on the earth,
he satisfied the wrath of God our daysman stood for us.

Yours in the Lord,

jm

Wandering Thoughts

How the mind causes our thoughts to wander:mind

The arrogance of the mind alienates us from the life of God, and from communion with him. When a present and appropriate petition or instruction is conveyed through the ear into the understanding, it shamelessly plays therewith, and takes occasion to run out on some contiguous notion; and from that to another and at length rests and dwells on some strange and unusual point, till the gates of good Spirit, and the present matter has ended. And thus by a default in the understanding, we seek not God, Psalm 53.2[i], nor find him as we might; and that excellent faculty, which would penetrate into the divine mysteries, and should guide the will and heart unto God, by the deceptiveness of its unmortified vanity, mislead us from the chief good, and entangles us in distractions. We read of a “defilement of body and spirit,” 2 Corinthians 7.1[ii], whereof surely this is a part, and must be cleansed in them that will “perfect holiness in the fear of God.” – Rev. Richard Steele (I’ve updated the language. Any words in italics have been altered.)

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[i] “God looks down from heaven on the children of man to see if there are any who understand, who seek after God.”

[ii] “Since we have these promises, beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from every defilement of body and spirit, bringing holiness to completion in the fear of God. “

Spiritual Formation & Discipline

Some encouragement I found on a forum. tornbible

  • Prayer (Matthew 6:9; 1 Thessalonians 5:17; Ephesians 6:18; Colossians 4:2; Acts 6:4)
  • Meditation (Philippians 4:8; Psalms 119:97; Psalms 1:2; Joshua 1:8)
  • Fasting (Matthew 6:16-18; Luke 5:35)
  • Study (2 Timothy 2:15; 2 Timothy 3:16-17)
  • Scripture Memorization (Colossians 3:16; Psalms 119:11; Psalms 119:16)
  • Simplicity (1 Thessalonians 4:11; Philippians 4:11; Matthew 6:33)
  • Silence (Psalms 62:5; Psalms 46:10; James 1:19)
  • Solitude (Matthew 14:23; Mark 1:35; Mark 6:31; Luke 5:15)
  • Submission (Ephesians 5:21; Mark 8:34-35; Luke 22:42)
  • Service (Mark 10:45; John 13:12-17; 1 Peter 4:10)
  • Giving (Matthew 5:42; Matthew 6:19-21; 2 Corinthians 9:6-8; Deuteronomy 16:17)
  • Fellowship (Hebrews 10:24-25; Acts 2:42; 1 Corinthians 14:26)
  • Celebration (John 15:11; Philippians 4:4)
  • Worship (Matthew 4:10; John 4:23-24)

The Viganò Letter

popeWell folks, it looks like Pope Francis knew about the sexual antics of Roman Catholic Cardinal McCarrik. You can read Carlo Maria Vigano‘s letter here where he names names and details the backroom discussions about homosexual abuse and behaviour in the Roman Church. Vigano was a Papal Nuncio which, “is an ecclesiastical diplomat, serving as an envoy or a permanent diplomatic representative of the Holy See.” It’s safe to say Vigano knew what was going on when he was “Apostolic Nuncio to the United States.”

In the letter Vigano explains how he sent letters to Rome warning numerous times about the actions of some of the American Bishops and Cardinals, their sex parties with seminarians and their general homosexual behaviour.  Keep in mind as you read that 80% of the abuse took place against post pubescent males which means it’s not paedophilia but pederasty as explained here and here. The abuse that occurred was homosexual in nature.

Not everyone has the time to read the letter or cares that much about it so I’ll give summary, briefly. We read that McCarrick was instrumental in electing Pope Francis and that Francis lifted the sanctions against McCarrick placed on him Pope Benedict. After all of this the Cardinal went on to became one of Popes primary advisers.

If I hadn’t been reading Scott Hahn’s Facebook page I would probably have miss it.

Yours in the Lord,

jm