Toward a Covenantal Theology

Posted back in 2011 (I believe): It's probably fair to say that most Calvinistic, Particular or "Reformed" Baptists feel peer pressure to pursue the study of paedobaptist covenantalism. I have been personally told on numerous occasions that I should move toward a "full" covenant theology and embrace the baptism of infants "into the covenant." In … Continue reading Toward a Covenantal Theology

Sacramental Controversy

"Sacraments had provoked controversy among Christians ever since Paul rebuked the church at Corinth for irregularities at the Lord's Supper (1 Cor. 11:20-34). The rudiments of medieval baptismal doctrine emerged in the course of contention between Augustine and the Donatists in the early fifth century. Roman eucharistic doctrine was shaped by the ninth-century that erupted … Continue reading Sacramental Controversy

The Westminster Assembly Debates Credopaedobaptism

Worth a read.

Petty France

In the seventeenth-century polemics of paedobaptism and credobaptism, one of the common arguments asserted by the English Particular Baptists was that their paedobaptist brothers agreed that a profession of faith was a necessary prerequisite for baptism. To make their point, Particular Baptists like Andrew Ritor, Benjamin Coxe, William Kiffin, Hanserd Knollys, and Thomas Patient appealed to the catechism of the Church of England, which was appended to the Book of Common Prayer. The catechism specifically required a profession of faith and repentance before admission to baptism. Here is the portion to which they referred:Church of England Catechism in Book of Common Prayer

The Particular Baptists viewed this as inconsistent credobaptism, or perhaps we could call it “credopaedobaptism.” If actual repentance and faith were necessary, how could these be promised by parents or godparents? Given their strong Calvinism, the idea of promising actual faith and repentance (which could only be given by God) for another was an absurdity. To the Particular Baptists…

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