Known

“O Lord, you have searched me and known me! You know when I sit down and when I rise up; you discern my thoughts from afar. You search out my path and my lying down and are acquainted with all my ways. Even before a word is on my tongue, behold, O Lord, you know it altogether.” Psalm 139.1-4

Jesus is willing to love you, knowing everything about you

Our Daysman

Happy Lord’s Day!

 

Webster’s 1828: DA’YSMAN, n. An umpire or arbiter; a mediator.
Neither is there any daysman betwixt us. Job 9.

There is one mediator between the Lord and man,
Christ Jesus was our daysman our sins were laid on Him.

Wounded for our transgressions and justice for our peace,
yet God was pleased to bruise Him for our iniquities.

With one hand on the heaven and one hand on the earth,
he satisfied the wrath of God our daysman stood for us.

Yours in the Lord,

jm

Bagpipes

bagpipes

Last night I had my first bagpipe lesson on a chanter. When asked my name I replied, “McIntyre” and Skip replied, “you’re off to a good start already!” We did the scale for about 1 hour, making sure the holes were covered and that I was getting the correct sound. It takes a lot out of you. I’ve played alto recorder, harmonica and concert flute in the past and this was a different experience. Totally. Often it sounded like a flock of geese going over head but I was assured that isn’t the normal sound we should be producing.

wesleyI’ve always loved the bagpipes and feel a strong pull in my chest every time I hear them played. I conjure up images of my ancestors being heroic and our military past. (see footnote) Like many decedents of immigrants our past is often murky but the more modern history I have been able to piece together.

My great grandfather Wesley McIntyre was a solider during the Great War and fought in the trenches. He was a staunch Presbyterian, an Orangeman and a Freemason. Private Wesley McIntyre went overseas March 26th, 1917 and proceeded to France August 25, 1917. Wesley was attached to the 18th Battalion – Machine Gun Section. Not having enough of it the first time around Wesley enlisted in 1940 and went to Europe wesley oldas a Sapper for the Royal Canadian Engineers. He was discharged in 1944. Before returning to Canada he went looking for his son, my great uncle Fred.

fredFred enlisted in ’43 when he was only 15 years old. His ship was sunk in ’44 on his way to battle the Nazi’s. Unfortunately he was taken captive and held by the Germans until the end of the war. Fred was haunted by his memories of which he never got over. The Germans would make P.O.W.’s fight over raw turnips so he hated turnips. By the time he was released he was under 90 lbs.
Fred also hated, absolutely hated Hogan’s Hero’s for their portrayal of a German prison camp.

My great uncle Don was apart of the Canadian Navy and served during the Korean War after which he joined the Merchant Marines and spent the rest of his life on the water. Whenever I light my pipe I think of uncle Don who was famous for his vanilla pipe tobacco, a voice that could carry over a high wind and his sea legs when he walked.

My Grandfather joined the Queen’s Own Rifles as a reservist but ended up being a sniper for the Canadian Forces during the Korean War. He’s almost 90 now.

This post is just one moment of reflection on my families past as I listen to Going Home. The bagpipes make me feel the past, like I’m going home or something. It’s weird. Maybe you feel it to? I had no idea what I was going to post today and I wrote without really thinking it over. The pictures are real pictures of my family members mentioned…I just added them in after.

I guess that’s all for now folks. May God bless you this weekend and may your Lord’s Day be spend in prayer and thanksgiving.

Yours in the Lord,

jm

 

Footnote: Family legend has it my great, great grandfather Archie McIntyre was ran out of Scotland for stealing chickens, but McIntyre’s are known for spinning humours stories so we don’t know if that’s true. lol

I have my application for the Orange Order filled out. I just need to send it off.

I will TRUST in the Lord

Simple.

Heart felt.

Enjoy.

I will trust in the Lord.
I will trust in the Lord.
I will trust in the Lord until I die
I will trust in the Lord.
I will trust in the Lord.
I will trust in the Lord until I die.
I’m goin’ to treat everybody right.
I’m goin’ to treat everybody right.
I’m goin’ to treat everybody right until I die
I’m goin’ to treat everybody right.
I’m goin’ to treat everybody right.
I’m goin’ to treat everybody right until I die.
I’m goin’ to stay on the battlefield.
I’m goin’ to stay on the battlefield.
I’m goin’ to stay on the battlefield until I die
I’m goin’ to stay on the battlefield.
I’m goin’ to stay on the battlefield.
I’m goin’ to stay on the battlefield until I die.
I’m goin’ to stay on a bended knee.
I’m goin’ to stay on a bended knee.
I’m goin’ to stay on a bended knee until I die
I’m goin’ to stay on a bended knee.
I’m goin’ to stay on a bended knee.
I’m goin’ to stay on a bended knee until I die.
I’m goin’ to watch, fight and pray.
I’m goin’ to watch, fight and pray.
I’m goin’ to watch, fight and pray until I die
I’m goin’ to watch, fight and pray.
I’m goin’ to watch, fight and pray.
I’m goin’ to watch, fight and pray until I die.

Songwriters: C.L. Franklin

Revelation and Worship

GRAVE“[F]or it seems plainly to be founded on the clearest notions of the light of nature, that the worship of God is to be regulated by the will and pleasure of God; which if he reveal not, how can we know it? Hence it was that the heathens never pretended reason, but always revelation for their worship.”

Thomas HalyburtonFaith and Revelation(1714; Aberdeen: James Begg Society, 2003), p. 93. (reblog from Reformed Covenanter)

Gospel Plough

CHURCH! – Get up and go. It’s the Lord’s Day, not yours, give it back to Him.

VictorianDivider[1]

Mary wore three links of chain
Every link had Jesus’ name

Keep your hand on that plough, hold right on
Hold on, (hold on) hold right on (can you hold right on)
Keep your hand on that plough, hold right on

Well, Peter got anxious and he said
Won’t you wash my hands and my feet and head

Keep your hand on that plough, hold right on
Hold on, (hold on) hold right on (can you hold right on)
Keep your hand on that plough, hold right on

Matthew, Mark and Luke and John
All my prophets dead and gone

Keep your hand on that plough, hold right on
Hold on, (hold on) hold right on (can you hold right on)
Keep your hand on that plough, hold right on

I ain’t never been to Heaven, but I’ve been told
It’s a first class city, and the streets are gold

Keep your hand on that plough, hold right on
Hold on, (hold on) hold right on (hold right on)
Keep your hand on that plough, hold right on

Conversations with Death

Some old school music with a tad bit of Bible and history thrown in.

But God will redeem my soul from the power of the grave: for he shall receive me. Selah. Psalm 49.15

“O Death, also known as O, Death, Oh Death and Conversations with Death, is a traditional American folk song. In 2004, the Journal of Folklore Research asserted that “O, Death” is Lloyd Chandler’s song “A Conversation with Death”, which Chandler performed in the 1920s while preaching in Appalachia.” – Wiki

Lyrics:

Oh death, oh death
Won’t you spare me over til another year

Well what is this that I can’t see With ice cold hands taking hold of me
Well I am death none can excel I’ll open the door to heaven or hell

Whoa death someone would pray Could you wait to call me til another day
The children pray the preacher preached Time and mercy is out of your reach

I’ll fix your feet til you can’t walk I’ll lock your jaw til you can’t talk
I’ll close your eyes so you can’t see This very hour come and go with me

In death I come to take the soul Leave the body and leave it cold
To drop the flesh off of the frame The earth and worms both have a claim

Oh death, oh death
Won’t you spare me over til another year

My mother came to my bed Place a cold towel upon my head
My head is warm my feet are cold Death is a movin upon my soul

Oh death how you’re treatin me You close my eyes so I can’t see
Well you’re hurtin my body you make me cold You run my life right out of my soul

Oh death please consider my age Please don’t take me at this stage
My wealth is all at your command If you’ll remove your icy hands

Oh the young the rich or poor All alike to me you know
No wealth no land no silver or gold Nothin satisfies my but your soul

Oh death, oh death
Won’t you spare me over til another year
Won’t you spare me over til another year
Won’t you spare me over til another year

 

“In The Midst Of Life We Are In Death” from Magill’s Quotations in Context
Context: According to The Order for the Burial of the Dead from The Book of Common Prayer, while the body is being made ready to be placed in the grave, there shall be said or sung, by those standing by, the anthem from which this quotation is taken. This anthem, retaining the medieval sense of awe and dread in the presence of death, acknowledges this sense as a judgment upon our sins from whose bitter pains we may be spared by the mercy of our Saviour and Judge. The anthem, one of the few survivals of the medieval spirit in the Prayer Book offices of the dead, is as follows:

Man, that is born of a woman, hath but a short time to live, and is full of misery. He cometh up, and is cut down, like a flower; he fleeth as it were a shadow, and never continueth in one stay.
In the midst of life we are in death; of whom may we seek for succour, but of thee, O Lord, who for our sins art justly displeased?
Yet, O Lord God most holy, O Lord most mighty, O holy and most merciful Saviour, deliver us not into the bitter pains of eternal death.
Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts; shut not thy merciful ears to our prayer; but spare us, Lord most holy, O God most mighty, O holy and merciful Saviour, thou most worthy Judge eternal, suffer us not, at our last hour, for any pains of death, to fall from thee.